fastcompany

Who else would try to catch the invisible man?

fastcompany:

Shadow Project Wins Latest Playful Smart Cities Initiative

An interactive public artwork involving shadows captured from passersby which interact with people who follow, winner of the 2014 Playable City Award announced June 9, will be installed in the city of Bristol by September.

"Shadowing"—created by design partnership Jonathan Chomko and Matthew Rosier, based in New York and Treviso, Italy, respectively—will use infrared technology to capture people’s outlines then project movement back as shadows once the people who have formed the shadows have moved on.

The project is designed to explore the disconnectedness that technology can create between strangers, the role light can play in creating a city’s character, and the unseen data alters and surveillance culture that pervades contemporary urban spaces, its creators claim.

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fastcompany
You’ll *actually* be able to mute your friends ;)
fastcompany:

Please remember to turn off your computer brain before boarding the airplane.
Aside from the addition of a whole lot more screens, daily life for most people doesn’t look much different than it did 10 or 15 years ago. But if scientists and eager startups are to be believed, the next few decades will be busting at the seams with dramatic, sci-fi inspired innovations, like synthetic meat, drone technology, and autonomous cars.
If these technologies pan out, the world will not only look very different, it will have to operate differently too. In a Tumblr called Signs from the Near Future ( signsfromthenearfuture ), designer Fernando Barbella explores what signage will look like when we have to absorb all of these innovations into human culture—perhaps there will be advertising discounts on test-tube burgers, or airport warnings for travelers who may have forgotten to turn off their computer brains.
Read More>

You’ll *actually* be able to mute your friends ;)

fastcompany:

Please remember to turn off your computer brain before boarding the airplane.

Aside from the addition of a whole lot more screens, daily life for most people doesn’t look much different than it did 10 or 15 years ago. But if scientists and eager startups are to be believed, the next few decades will be busting at the seams with dramatic, sci-fi inspired innovations, like synthetic meat, drone technology, and autonomous cars.

If these technologies pan out, the world will not only look very different, it will have to operate differently too. In a Tumblr called Signs from the Near Future ( signsfromthenearfuture ), designer Fernando Barbella explores what signage will look like when we have to absorb all of these innovations into human culture—perhaps there will be advertising discounts on test-tube burgers, or airport warnings for travelers who may have forgotten to turn off their computer brains.

Read More>